Archive for the ‘What Would You Do’ category

What would you do, part 9 – Jesse Winchester or Chris Kelly

October 20th, 2009

Admittedly, the Ottawa Senators are in a pretty enviable position. They are winning hockey games — sometimes games they shouldn’t win — and they effectively have a full roster of NHL-capable players. The only foreseeable problem is that some of those players aren’t playing.

With Peter Regin, Jesse Winchester and Filip Kuba all out of the line-up for various injuries, the Ottawa Senators showed that they could still win without their full roster. But in the new NHL, winning isn’t everything, and the business side sometimes creeps a little too far into the operational side of things.

Hence the current dilemma for the Senators. With Jesse Winchester now able to return, something has to give. And it may just come down to dollars and cents.

So I give you the newest entry in the now famous, sometimes duplicated, but still unparalleled, What Would You Do series.

Jesse Winchester vs. Chris Kelly

Jesse Winchester: 6’1, 215 lbs

Chris Kelly: 6’0, 200 lbs

Marginal differences here, but anyone who has watched the two of them play knows that Jesse Winchester tends to play a bit more physical style game. His two fights against Atlanta last season are also a testament to his willingness to drop the gloves, even though he probably has no business being in a fight.

Jesse Winchester: October 4, 1983

Chris Kelly: November 11, 1980

Tough to say what that three year age difference means. Chris Kelly does have 3 more years of playing experience, but Jesse Winchester is not really a rookie in the traditional sense of the term. I would have to say, given that Kelly is almost 30, while Winchester is still 25, this one goes to Jesse. He’s still got a few more years to grow as a player, whereas Kelly has most likely peaked in his role and ability.

Jesse Winchester 2009 Totals: 76 GP, 3 G, 15 A, 18 Pts

Chris Kelly 2009 Totals: 82 GP, 12 G, 11, A, 23 Pts

Clearly Kelly can put up a few more goals than Winchester does, and a lot of those goals tend to come shorthanded. Kelly had an off year last year, but these were the only comparable numbers I could use, given that Winchester played his first full season with the team last year. Seeing that Winchester took a lot of last season to find his role on the squad (moving from 1st line to 4th line), these numbers are pretty good for Winchester. But give this one to Kelly.

Jesse Winchester Cap Hit: $550,000 until 2010

Chris Kelly Cap Hit: $2.125 million until 2012

From a purely financial standpoint, Winchester takes this one by a considerable margin. Kelly is now playing mostly 4th line minutes, so can you really afford a more than $2 million hit on that line?

Jesse Winchester Shorthanded TOI: 39:20 (TOI last season- 804:39)

Chris Kelly Shorthanded TOI: 253:52 (TOI last season- 1,279:12)

This is clearly where the difference between the two players starts to creep in. Kelly–and it would be hard to argue this–is one of the best shorthanded players in the league. This is easily reflected by the amount of time he plays shorthanded. He averages about 3:05 of shorthanded TOI per game. Winchester, on the other hand, averages about 0:31 of shorthanded TOI per game. Give this one to Kelly.

Bottom Line

There is a lot of difficulty in trying to replace a player of Kelly’s calibre when it comes to his penalty killing skills. Whether a player like Winchester can step up and play those big minutes remains to be seen. However, Kelly’s cap hit, and softer play doesn’t exactly warm the coddles of the fans’ hearts. Winchester’s age, cap hit, and style of play are probably more noticeable, and he is certainly a swing player that you don’t want to leave sitting on the bench.

Kelly will likely be the whipping boy for this season, largely because of how much money he makes. However, I don’t think you can slot in a Jesse Winchester to play his role. So while I still want to see Winchester in the line-up, I don’t think you can do it at the expense of Chris Kelly.

Stay classy, Chris Kelly and Jesse Winchester.

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What would you do, part 8 – Ottawa Senators rookies

September 10th, 2009

The What Would You Do series was originally devised by Tambland to defend against Jason Spezza trade rumours. It has now grown to include coaches and NHL cities. Other parts of the series can be found here.

Yes! Training Camp is starting on Saturday, which only means one thing. Hockey is back! How long has this summer been? I would like to extend my warmest gratitude to Dany Heatley for at least giving us something to talk about. Also, I would like to extend my coldest shoulder to Dany Heatley for making me talk about that all summer.

The return of hockey also means another thing: the return of the hugely popular “What Would You Do” series.

For today’s comparison, two rookies expected to fight for a spot on the Ottawa Senators.

Zach Smith vs. Peter Regin

Peter Regin: 23 years old

Zach Smith: 21 years old

Alright, not really sure what to do here when it comes to age of rookies. On the one hand, Regin has a couple more years of maturity on and off the ice. But he’s that much closer to being in his late 20s. Smith, while still young, has really only been playing professional hockey for a season and a half. I’m going to call this one a draw, and hope it works itself out later.

Peter Regin Astrology Sign: Aries

Zach Smith Astrology Sign: Aries

Damn! Another draw. However, through my extensive research, either player does bode well for the Senators. Apparently, “…Aries people are ‘doers’ rather than ‘talkers’. They are the impulsive, act first, ask questions or have doubts later, sign of the zodiac.” Take that Brian Burke: We got Truculent and Belligerent all wrapped up! Hit and ask questions later!

Peter Regin Draft Selection: 3rd Round, 87th Overall, 2004 Draft

Zach Smith Draft Selection: 3rd Round, 79th Overall, 2008 Draft

Again, marginal differences between the two. I will say this though. Regin was a Muckler draft pick, while Smith was a Murray pick. Plus Smith is close to cracking the line-up almost 4 years earlier than Smith. I guess I’ll give this to Smith, because he probably fits more of a Murray style role on the Senators line-up.

Peter Regin: 6’0, 180 lbs

Zach Smith: 6’2, 202 lbs

Alright. Here we go. Smith is the bigger player here. And at 21, you have to think he can still put on a few pounds. 6’2 isn’t huge in this NHL, but it isn’t small either. The scouting record seems to be that Smith is a hard-nosed player, so that height and weight should bode well for him. This one goes to Smith.

Peter Regin Binghamton Totals: 56 GP, 18 G, 29 A, 47 PTS

Zach Smith Binghamton Totals: 79 GP, 24 G, 24 G, 48 PTS

So Regin is going to take this one. He’s much closer to a point a game player, and he appears to be able to dish the puck as well as put it in the net. This one goes to Regin.

Peter Regin Playoff Totals (Swedish Elite League): 18 GP, 4 G, 9 A, 13 PTS

Zach Smith Playoff Totals (Western Hockey League): 21 GP, 5 G, 7 A, 12 PTS

I’m going to go out on a limb here and compare the SEL and the WHL as similar leagues. Now keep in mind it is a far limb. But I’m also going to go out on a limb and give this one to Regin. It’s only numbers folks, but you can’t lie with stats.

There are a number of intangibles with both players here as well. Regin has a bit more NHL experience, and has even put some points on the board. But Smith has made big leaps and bounds since he joined the Senators organization. The fact that we’re acknowledging that Smith could make the team speaks volumes for his progression. Regin has a lot of international experience to his credit, but he is Danish. Smith would have had a much deeper system to battle through.

I’m going to go with Regin over Smith this season, with the expectation that Smith makes quite a few call-up runs to Ottawa. But Regin’s age and stats are hard to argue, and after seeing this kid play, I think he’s going to be a great asset this season.

Stay classy, Ottawa Senators rookies.

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What would you do, part 7 – Olympic edition?

July 13th, 2009

Maybe I’m a bit guilty of giving Jason Spezza too much credit.  But the fact is, I like him as a hockey player, and he seems like a genuinely good person.  I mean, night after night, despite how the game went, he can be counted on to face the cameras.  And yes, sometimes he giggles at bad times, and yes it can sometimes seem like he doesn’t care, but the man is being paid to play his favourite game.  You’d probably be smiling too.

So I felt a bit slighted on behalf of Jason Spezza when he wasn’t named to the invitation camp for Team Canada.  Now a lot of players weren’t invited, and some players were who won’t likely make the team (I’m looking at you Milan Lucic), so it can’t be all bad.  And there is a very serious likelihood that Spezza can probably play himself onto the team.  The retirement of Joe Sakic has likely opened the door for that as well.  But yet there’s still a debate over who should go.

So I present to you, Part 7 in the widely popular What Would You Do series, Jason Spezza vs. Marc Savard.

Jason Spezza age: 26 years old, will be 27 years old for the Olympics.

Marc Savard age: 31 years old, will be 32 years old for the Olympics.

Now Spezza will probably have another chance to make the 2014 games, while Marc Savard likely won’t.  But is that a good enough reason to not let youth win here?  By giving Spezza a chance now, you also guarantee some experience on the 2014 squad as well.  I’m going to have to go with Spezza here.

Jason Spezza size: 6’3, 216 lbs

Marc Savard size: 5’10, 191 lbs

Again, I’m going to have to go with Spezza here.  The size is going to be a big factor on the smaller ice surface in Vancouver.  Maybe Canada went too big in 2006, but I don’t think it will be as much of a factor in 2010.  Plus, we’re not talking about a slow player in Jason Spezza.  He has soft hands and can find space on the ice very well.  2 points for Spezza.

Jason Spezza International Appearances: 3 National Junior Team appearances, 2 National Team appearances

Marc Savard International Appearances: 0

Again, this doesn’t say much other than Spezza just has more experience on the international stage and representing Canada.  I’m not saying that Savard would be a bad candidate for the Canadian team, but you have to think that those 5 appearances have given Spezza some upper hand here.

Jason Spezza 2008/09 Point Totals: 82 GP, 32 G, 41 A, 73 pts

Marc Savard 2008/09 Point Totals: 82 GP, 25 G, 63 A, 88 pts

Savard has been no slouch in the point total department, and last year was no different.  While Spezza had an off year by his usual standards, Savard was quietly showing the skill he displayed in his days in Atlanta and Boston when he posted point totals of 97 and 96, respectively.  Spezza has never broken the 100 point barrier himself, but at 26, will have more opportunity to do it.  Give this one to Savard, with honourable mention to Spezza.

Bottom Line:

Spezza brings some added size, international experience and youth to the Canadian Olympic Team.  While neither were invited to camp, I would have to think that Hockey Canada should be looking closer at Jason Spezza, rather than Marc Savard.  Both players, ironically enough, have shown they can dish the puck well to Dany Heatley, so that argument should go out the window.  Rather, Hockey Canada should go with Spezza and show the world that we are not just thinking about 2010, but 2014 as well.

Stay Classy, Marc Savard.

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What would you do, part 6 – Dany Heatley style?

June 17th, 2009

So Dany Heatley wants out? Unfortunate on the one hand, as over he’s scored 260 goals and 543 points in 507 games. Fortunate on the other hand, as Ottawa gets to bring in something in return for the “Dominant Dany Heatley.”

 

Across the Internet, the prognosticators are all talking about who might be coming back to Ottawa in return for Heater. Cammaleri? Frolov? Johnson? Phaneuf? All these names have been thrown about. But we here at stayclassy.net don’t always follow the mainstream. We think outside the box. So I present the sixth part of the now famous “What Would You Do” series:

 

Dany Heatley vs. A Bucket of Pucks

Dany Heatley’s Age: 28 years old

Bucket of Pucks Age: Brand New

Well you have to think the Bucket of Pucks wins here. They are, after all, brand new. They may wear out faster, but even that is debatable.

Dany Heatley’s Career Goal Totals: 260 goals

Bucket of Pucks Goal Totals: 7,006 goals scored in the 2008/2009 NHL season.

That’s a lot more goals than Heatley has even scored in his career. Got to go with the Bucket of Pucks on this one.

Dany Heatley Dimensions: 6’3, 220 lbs

Puck Dimensions: 1 inch thick, 3 inches in diameter, weighs between 51/2 ounces and 6 ounces.

Alright, so Heatley is a bit bigger here. He has the potential to go hard to the net and sacrifice his body for a goal (remember, I said potential). But if a puck goes charging at the net and goes in, at least it’s a goal.

Dany Heatley Material: Skin and bones, with some muscle, and hard plastic to protect him.

Puck Material: Vulcanized rubber.

Have to go with the puck here. Heatley has to gear up just to go out on the ice. The puck goes out there naked. The puck also has no aversion to pain, as indicated by the number of times it can be hit and keep coming back. Heatley, on the other hand, has demonstrated an aversion to pain, as indicated by the number of times he is willing to hit or be hit.

Dany Heatley and Bucket of Pucks- The Intangibles

There are a number of other factors that can be discussed with statistics. Take for instance, the warm-up. Often Dany Heatley just lazily skates around, shoots a couple times, stretches, and gets ready for the game. The Bucket of Pucks, however, is out there until the bitter end. You have to get a Zamboni on the ice just to get those pucks off. Now that’s dedication.

A Bucket of Pucks will never call out the coach for not getting enough ice time. A Bucket of Pucks is just happy to be playing.

Jason Spezza might actually be able to do more with a Bucket of Pucks than with a Dany Heatley.

 

**

So there you have it folks. Dany Heatley for a Bucket of Pucks. I’ll let you decide on this one.

 

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What would you do, part 5 – Coaching style?

May 26th, 2009

 

Well, it’s been quite a while since there was much to talk about in the Battle of Alberta. But since both the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames have fired their coaches in the off season and are announcing new ones today, I thought it might be fitting to do a comparison to help out any teams that might be looking for coaching in the future. So part 5 of the “What Would You Do” series offers this story of two jilted coaches.
 
Craig MacTavish vs. Mike Keenan
 
Craig MacTavish birthday: August 15, 1958
Mike Kennan birthday: October 21, 1949
 
Craigers is about ten years younger than Mike, so less likelihood of mid-game naps, senile press conferences and periodic stories of “when I was a child.” This one goes to Mac-T.
 
MacTavish’s hockey career: 19 seasons as a player in the NHL
Kennan’s hockey career: 0 seasons as a player in the NHL
 
Mac-T has spent more time on NHL rinks than Mike has. That NHL experience makes MacTavish the better choice, I believe. 
 
MacTavish’s coaching record: 656 games- 301 (W) – 252 (L) – 47 (T) – 56 (OTL) – .457 winning percentage
Kennan’s coaching record: 1386 games- 672 (W) – 531 (L) – 147 (T) – 36 (OTL) –  .484 winning percentage
 
Well, I guess this one goes to Kennan, on account of the more games coached, as well as the winning percentage.
 
MacTavish’s playoff coaching record: 19-17 .528 winning percentage
Kennan’s playoff coaching record: 96-75 .561 winning percentage
 
Again, give this one to Iron Mike. More experience and a higher winning percentage. 
 
MacTavish’s Stanley Cups: 4 as a player- 1987- Edmonton, 1988- Edmonton, 1989- Edmonton, 1994- New York Rangers
Kennan’s Stanley Cups: 1 as a coach- 1994- New York Rangers
 
This one goes to Mac-T again, just because he was a big part of that Oilers dynasty, could pull off wearing orange and blue, and stuck with the Oilers in his coaching career as well. 
Oh, this also goes to MacTavish because Keenan wouldn’t have that Cup in ’94 without him. Well, him and Messier and Lowe and Anderson and Leetch and Richter. But you get the point. 
 
MacTavish’s Bad-Ass-ness: Last player in the NHL to not wear a helmet.
Kennan’s Bad-Ass-ness: Nicknamed ‘Iron Mike.’
 
This one goes to Mac-T. I mean, there is a certain stupidity to not wearing a helmet, but how bad-ass is that. 
 
So for all you GMs out there looking to fill a coaching role, I just made your job a bit easier. Don’t worry about Keenan’s experience. Just give Mac-T a call. 
 
You stay classy Craig MacTavish. 

Well, it’s been quite a while since there was much to talk about in the Battle of Alberta.  But since both the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames have fired their coaches in the off season and are announcing new ones today, I thought it might be fitting to do a comparison to help out any teams that might be looking for coaching in the future.  So part 5 of the “What Would You Do” series offers this story of two jilted coaches.

 

Craig MacTavish vs. Mike Keenan

 

Craig MacTavish birthday: August 15, 1958

Mike Kennan birthday: October 21, 1949

 

Craigers is about ten years younger than Mike, so less likelihood of mid-game naps, senile press conferences and periodic stories of “when I was a child.”  This one goes to Mac-T.

 

MacTavish’s hockey career: 19 seasons as a player in the NHL

Kennan’s hockey career: 0 seasons as a player in the NHL

 

Mac-T has spent more time on NHL rinks than Mike has.  That NHL experience makes MacTavish the better choice, I believe. 

 

MacTavish’s coaching record: 656 games- 301 (W) – 252 (L) – 47 (T) – 56 (OTL) – .457 winning percentage

Kennan’s coaching record: 1386 games- 672 (W) – 531 (L) – 147 (T) – 36 (OTL) –  .484 winning percentage

 

Well, I guess this one goes to Kennan, on account of the more games coached, as well as the winning percentage.

 

MacTavish’s playoff coaching record: 19-17 .528 winning percentage

Kennan’s playoff coaching record: 96-75 .561 winning percentage

 

Again, give this one to Iron Mike.  More experience and a higher winning percentage. 

 

MacTavish’s Stanley Cups: 4 as a player- 1987- Edmonton, 1988- Edmonton, 1989- Edmonton, 1994- New York Rangers

Kennan’s Stanley Cups: 1 as a coach- 1994- New York Rangers

 

This one goes to Mac-T again, just because he was a big part of that Oilers dynasty, could pull off wearing orange and blue, and stuck with the Oilers in his coaching career as well. 

Oh, this also goes to MacTavish because Keenan wouldn’t have that Cup in ’94 without him.  Well, him and Messier and Lowe and Anderson and Leetch and Richter.  But you get the point. 

 

MacTavish’s Bad-Ass-ness: Last player in the NHL to not wear a helmet.

Kennan’s Bad-Ass-ness: Nicknamed ‘Iron Mike.’

 

This one goes to Mac-T.  I mean, there is a certain stupidity to not wearing a helmet, but how bad-ass is that?

 

So for all you GMs out there looking to fill a coaching role, I just made your job a bit easier.  Don’t worry about Keenan’s experience.  Just give Mac-T a call. 

 

Stay classy, Craig MacTavish. 

 

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What would you do (Part 4) with the Phoenix Coyotes?

May 12th, 2009

This time the “What Would You Do” series is extending into the realm of NHL Franchise relocation.

Today’s challengers: Hamilton vs. Winnipeg

Population of Hamilton: 692,911 (Census Metropolitan Area)
Population of Winnipeg: 694,668 (Census Metropolitan Area)

This one actually surprised me, but you have to remember that Hamilton has more metropolitan areas surrounding it than Winnipeg does. Numbers-wise, Winnipeg wins, but with intangibles (aka the GTA and Detroit), Hamilton gets it. +1 for Hamilton.

Hamilton Professional Sports Teams: Hamilton Tiger-Cats (CFL) and Hamilton Bulldogs (AHL)
Winnipeg Professional Sports Teams: Winnipeg Blue Bombers (CFL), Manitoba Moose (AHL) and Winnipeg Goldeyes (Northern League Baseball)

No one saw that one coming did they? Winnipeg is actually supporting three professional sports franchises. This could work for or against them. On the one side, they’ve got a fan base that is showing up to sports games. On the other hand, is there enough corporate support spread between three franchises that could possibly support a fourth? I’m going to say Winnipeg takes this one though, because of nostaglia and an apparent willingness to support local sports teams.

Hamilton Hockey Arena: Copps Coliseum- built in 1985- seats up to 17,383 for ice hockey
Winnipeg Hockey Arena: MTS Centre- built in 2004- seats up to 15,015 for ice hockey

Copps Coliseum was built specifically in the hopes that it could bring an NHL franchise to Hamilton. While it may be older, it already seats more than the MTS Centre. Both arenas have hosted IIHF events (World Juniors and World Women’s). The belief is that a smaller arena could create a positive supply and demand situation in Winnipeg, but I think Copps has more potential because it is already a bigger venue. Give this to Hamilton.

Hamilton AHL Franchise- Hamilton Bulldogs/Montreal Canadiens
Winnipeg AHL Franchise- Manitoba Moose/Vancouver Canucks

This one goes to Winnipeg strictly by association between Hamilton and the Montreal Canadiens. Oh those poor Canadiens.

Hamilton’s Nostalgia Appeal- none.
Winnipeg’s Nostalgia Appeal- everything.

Who wouldn’t want to see the return of the Jets, White-outs, and retribution for a lost Canadian franchise.

BOTTOM LINE:

While Hamilton is more likely to be able to support an NHL franchise, the Phoenix Coyotes are the wrong team to move there. Winnipeg has shown that it can support sports teams, and they deserve a chance–under the new CBA and current economic climate–to show that the Phoenix/Winnipeg franchise can be a success there again. Hamilton should still get a team from the Sun Belt, but not this one.

Stay classy Hamilton. You’ll get there soon.

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What would you do, part 3 – General Manager style?

May 8th, 2009

 

Here at stayclassy.net, we strive for excellence in our writing and thoughts. The “Who Would You Do” series began on a whim, comparing Jason Spezza and Joe Thornton. It then grew to include Mattias Ohlund vs. Filip Kuba. Not to pigeon-hole ourselves (That’s What She Said!) with player discussions, we’re opening the forum to GM discussions. So without further ado, What Would You Do? General Manager edition. If you were the Minnesota Wild, who would you pick. 
 
Pierre McGuire vs. Pat Quinn
 
Pierre McGuire’s real name: Regis McGuire
Pat Quinn’s real name: John Brian Patrick Quinn
 
We have a real affinity for multiple first name’s here at stayclassy.net (Cory Perry as an example). So I’m going to have to give this one to Pat, just because it takes so long to get to his last name. Good on him. 
 
Pierre McGuire’s birthday: August 8, 1961
Pat Quinn’s birthday: January 29, 1943
 
Since age probably doesn’t play as big of a factor in general managing, unless of course one of these guys is fluent in social media, I decided to look at astrological signs. Pat Quinn is an Aquarius, which, according to astrology.com, means that 
“They are progressive thinkers and are great at forming new ideologies and theories, any type of research is very suited to Aquarius. Aquarius one downfall in the business world is the attention to detail, they like the grand ideas and massive plans and can make them happen, but the mundane day to day repetitive details causes them to procrastinate.”
Pierre McQuire is a Leo:
“Business dealings are easy and successful for Leo, if they are in command and control…They will never settle for second best.”
 
So what does this mean for the Minnesota Wild. Well, I think Pat will get tired of trying to sign free agents. Which means Marian Gaborik won’t get signed. And Pierre will not settle for second best, which also means that Marian Gaborik won’t get signed. 
 
Pierre McGuire’s Hockey Career: professional hockey in Europe.
Pat Quinn’s Hockey Career: NHL player and best known for a huge open-ice hit on Bobby Orr.
 
Let’s say Pierre wins this one, just because no one hits Bobby Orr and gets away with it. NOBODY.
 
Number of Stanley Cups:
McGuire- 2, Pittsburgh Penguins, scout and assistant coach
Quinn- 0
 
I think it’s safe to give this one to McGuire. Pat has been to the show twice as a coach, but couldn’t finish the job. 
 
Pierre McGuire’s Ontario Connection- Scout and Assistant Coach for the Ottawa Senators
Pat Quinn’s Ontario Connection- who the hell cares
 
Um, yeah. Safe to say that the scouting work Pierre did in Ottawa helped build a team that made the playoffs 11 years in a row. I don’t know if I remember what Quinn was doing at that time.

Here at stayclassy.net, we strive for excellence in our writing and thoughts.  The “Who Would You Do” series began on a whim, comparing Jason Spezza and Joe Thornton.  It then grew to include Mattias Ohlund vs. Filip Kuba.  Not to pigeon-hole ourselves (That’s What She Said!) with player discussions, we’re opening the forum to GM discussions.  So without further ado, What Would You Do? General Manager edition.  If you were the Minnesota Wild, who would you pick?

Pierre McGuire vs. Pat Quinn

Pierre McGuire (left) & Pat Quinn (right)

Pierre McGuire (left) & Pat Quinn (right)

Pierre McGuire’s real name: Regis McGuire
Pat Quinn’s real name: John Brian Patrick Quinn

We have a real affinity for multiple first name’s here at stayclassy.net (Cory Perry as an example).  So I’m going to have to give this one to Pat, just because it takes so long to get to his last name.  Good on him. 
 

Pierre McGuire’s birthday: August 8, 1961
Pat Quinn’s birthday: January 29, 1943

Since age probably doesn’t play as big of a factor in general managing, unless of course one of these guys is fluent in social media, I decided to look at astrological signs.  Pat Quinn is an Aquarius, which, according to astrology.com, means that:

“They are progressive thinkers and are great at forming new ideologies and theories, any type of research is very suited to Aquarius. Aquarius one downfall in the business world is the attention to detail, they like the grand ideas and massive plans and can make them happen, but the mundane day to day repetitive details causes them to procrastinate.”

Pierre McQuire is a Leo:

“Business dealings are easy and successful for Leo, if they are in command and control…They will never settle for second best.”

 

So what does this mean for the Minnesota Wild?  Well, I think Pat will get tired of trying to sign free agents.  Which means Marian Gaborik won’t get signed.  And Pierre will not settle for second best, which also means that Marian Gaborik won’t get signed. 

Pierre McGuire’s Hockey Career: professional hockey in Europe.
Pat Quinn’s Hockey Career: NHL player and best known for a huge open-ice hit on Bobby Orr.

Let’s say Pierre wins this one, just because no one hits Bobby Orr and gets away with it.  NOBODY.

 

Number of Stanley Cups:
McGuire- 2, Pittsburgh Penguins, scout and assistant coach
Quinn- 0

 

I think it’s safe to give this one to McGuire. Pat has been to the show twice as a coach, but couldn’t finish the job. 


Pierre McGuire’s Ontario Connection- Scout and Assistant Coach for the Ottawa Senators
Pat Quinn’s Ontario Connection- who the hell cares

Um, yeah.  Safe to say that the scouting work Pierre did in Ottawa helped build a team that made the playoffs 11 years in a row.  I don’t know if I remember what Quinn was doing at that time. 

 

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What would you do, part 2?

May 5th, 2009

 

Time for another game of “The Grass Ain’t Always Greener.”
 
I think there is a propensity of casual hockey fans (certainly not the ones reading this blog) to pull the trigger on deals too often. In many cases, a straight one-for-one trade rarely works out, nor marks any significant improvement. I can only think of a few cases where these have worked (Heatley for Hossa), and even those can be debated. To see how this game works, check out our blog on a Thornton for Spezza trade.
 
I present to you : Filip Kuba vs. Mattias Ohlund
 
Filip Kuba: 6’5, 226 lbs
Mattias Ohlund: 6’3, 230 lbs
 
Ohlund is a bit bigger weight wise, but Kuba is taller. Both should play the body more. 
 
Filip Kuba: 32 years old, drafted in 1995
Mattias Ohlund: 32 years old, drafted in 1994
 
This one is a wash age-wise. Kuba was drafted a year later than Ohlund and played his first NHL career game a year later as well. Ohlund decided to hold out for three seasons before signing, so he loses what we will call Alexei Yashin points here. But Ohlund does have more NHL experience. 
 
Kuba: Drafted 8th round, 192nd overall.
Ohlund: Drafted 1st round, 13th overall.
 
You have to give this one to Ohlund, seeing as he was the higher pick. But history has shown us that draft position doesn’t mean a thing once the puck has dropped (take, oh I don’t know, Alexandre Daigle and Daniel Alfredsson as an example).
 
Kuba’s first full NHL season: 2000-01 season- 75 GP, 9 goals, 21 assists, 30 points
Ohlunds’ first full NHL season: 1997-98 season- 77 GP, 7 goals, 23 assists, 30 points
 
I’m going to go with Kuba here, as this first season was played with the Minnesota Wild; a rather defensive minded team. The points total may be the same, but Kuba also did it in two fewer games. It’s marginal numbers, but stats don’t lie.
 
 
Kuba’s post lockout numbers: 292 GP, 30 goals, 103 assists, 133 points
Ohlund’s post lockout numbers: 290 GP, 39 goals, 74 assists, 113 points
 
Again, the numbers are close, but I have to again give this to Kuba. He has two more games at hand, but 20 points more than Ohlund. 
 
Kuba’s Playoff numbers: 24 GP, 4 goals, 9 assists, 13 points
Ohlund’s Playoff numbers: 42 GP, 8 goals, 17 assists, 25 points
 
Kuba averages half a point per game. Ohlund averages a bit more. Ohlund’s playoff experience may win him out here, but point totals remain consistent. Call it a slight victory for Ohlund. But expect Kuba to put up some numbers in the playoffs next year. Remember, his playoff experience was in Minnesota- a notorious defensive system- and Tampa, where Dan Boyle took most of the defensive points.
 
Kuba’s contract: 3 year deal, $3 million per season
Ohlund’s contract: Pending UFA. Made $3.5 million per season
 
This one goes to Kuba. That half a million is a fourth liner now, and knowing the way the free agent market has worked lately, Ohlund is bound to be overpaid this summer.
 
So again, who would you do? Save the money and stick with Kuba. You may get more points out of it anyway.

Time for another game of “The Grass Ain’t Always Greener.”

I think there is a propensity of casual hockey fans (certainly not the ones reading this blog) to pull the trigger on deals too often.  In many cases, a straight one-for-one trade rarely works out, nor marks any significant improvement.  I can only think of a few cases where these have worked (Dany Heatley for Marian Hossa), and even those can be debated.  To see how this game works, check out our blog on a Thornton for Spezza trade.

 

I present to you:  Filip Kuba vs. Mattias Ohlund

 

Filip Kuba: 6’5, 226 lbs

Mattias Ohlund: 6’3, 230 lbs

 

Ohlund is a bit bigger weight wise, but Kuba is taller.  Both should play the body more. 

 

Filip Kuba: 32 years old, drafted in 1995

Mattias Ohlund: 32 years old, drafted in 1994

This one is a wash age-wise.  Kuba was drafted a year later than Ohlund and played his first NHL career game a year later as well. Ohlund decided to hold out for three seasons before signing, so he loses what we will call Alexei Yashin points here. But Ohlund does have more NHL experience. 

 

Kuba: Drafted 8th round, 192nd overall.

Ohlund: Drafted 1st round, 13th overall.

You have to give this one to Ohlund, seeing as he was the higher pick.  But history has shown us that draft position doesn’t mean a thing once the puck has dropped (take, oh I don’t know, Alexandre Daigle and Daniel Alfredsson as an example).

 

Kuba’s first full NHL season: 2000-01 season- 75 GP, 9 goals, 21 assists, 30 points

Ohlunds’ first full NHL season: 1997-98 season- 77 GP, 7 goals, 23 assists, 30 points

I’m going to go with Kuba here, as this first season was played with the Minnesota Wild; a rather defensive minded team.  The points total may be the same, but Kuba also did it in two fewer games.  It’s marginal numbers, but stats don’t lie.

 

Kuba’s post lockout numbers: 292 GP, 30 goals, 103 assists, 133 points

Ohlund’s post lockout numbers: 290 GP, 39 goals, 74 assists, 113 points

Again, the numbers are close, but I have to again give this to Kuba.  He has two more games at hand, but 20 points more than Ohlund. 

 

Kuba’s Playoff numbers: 24 GP, 4 goals, 9 assists, 13 points

Ohlund’s Playoff numbers: 42 GP, 8 goals, 17 assists, 25 points

Kuba averages half a point per game.  Ohlund averages a bit more.  Ohlund’s playoff experience may win him out here, but point totals remain consistent.  Call it a slight victory for Ohlund.  But expect Kuba to put up some numbers in the playoffs next year.  Remember, his playoff experience was in Minnesota- a notorious defensive system- and Tampa, where Dan Boyle took most of the defensive points.

 

Kuba’s contract: 3 year deal, $3 million per season

Ohlund’s contract: Pending UFA. Made $3.5 million per season

This one goes to Kuba.  That half a million is a fourth liner now, and knowing the way the free agent market has worked lately, Ohlund is bound to be overpaid this summer.

 

So again, who would you do?  Save the money and stick with Kuba.  You may get more points out of it anyway.

 

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What would you do?

April 29th, 2009

 There’s a very famous game called Who Would You Do?  The premise is pretty simple.  Given a choice, decide who you would do.

Your choices: Jason Spezza or Joe Thornton.

Now before you break into song about who you would pick, let’s have a look at a few figures.  Let’s called it the STD discussion before you jump into bed.  Sometimes the grass isn’t actually that green on the other side.

Jason Spezza: 25 years old
Joe Thornton: 29 years old 
Let’s give this one to Spezza, given that those four years will mean a big difference in only a few more seasons.

 
Jason Spezza: Drafted 2nd overall
Joe Thornton: Drafted 1st overall
Let’s call this a wash.  The difference in draft selection is miniscule. 


Thornton’s first full season in the NHL: 16 goals, 25 assists, 41 points.
Spezza’s first full season in the NHL: 22 goals, 33 assists, 55 points.
Considering Spezza’s first season was played under a stifling defensive system of Jacques Martin, I have to give Spezza a bit more credit here. 

Spezza’s current contract: 7 year, $49 million (averages $7 million a season, going into the second year of the deal)
Thornton’s current contract: 3 year, $21.6 million (averages $7.2 million a season, going into the second year of the deal)
Money-wise, it’s a wash.  This one probably goes to Thornton given that it is a shorter contract. But put it this way.  Thornton will be 33 years old when he finishes his contract.  Spezza will be 32 years old when he finishes his.
Look at it another way.  Thornton’s career totals increased each year  when he was 25, 26, and 27 years old.  His totals are now declining.  Spezza hasn’t even played at that age category yet. Look for better numbers over the next 3 seasons.

 
Thornton’s career playoff totals: 70 GP, 11 G, 37 A, 48 Pts- Average points per game: 0.6 
Spezza’s career playoff totals: 40 GP, 13 G, 26 A, 39 Pts- Average points per game: 0.9 
Have to give this to Spezza again.  Numbers are too good.  That’s so close to a point a game, it’s not even funny.


Number of Stanley Cup Finals GP
Spezza- 5
Thornton- 0
‘Nough said.

 

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